In the Golden afternoon.. 🌷🌾🌸🌺🌱🌹

In the Golden afternoon.. 🌷🌾🌸🌺🌱🌹


missjunkfoodjunkie:

HAUNTED MANSION WEDDING

I mentioned my ultimate interest in a Hocus Pocus - themed wedding a ways back, but after seeing a lot of gorgeous Victorian touches on pinterest, I now feel like a Haunted Mansion theme would be more fitting. Anyone who knows me knows I am a HUGE Disney fanatic, and have been to Disneyland more times times than I can recall. My fiancee and I have had many wonderful trips there, and Haunted Mansion holds a dear place in my heart. It would be awesome if I could get married on the ride itself, but as far as I know in-park weddings can only be held in front of the castle :( 

Anyway, enjoy! 

P.S. - just put together a separate blog specifically for my future Haunted Mansion wedding - http://happiesthaunts.tumblr.com/

This is my dream come true. Bless this post, now I can live vicariously


danimeowmarie:

danimeowmarie: A rare behind the scenes glimpse of a rather serious looking Victorian (1890s) bride who is being dressed for her big day.

danimeowmarie:

danimeowmarie: A rare behind the scenes glimpse of a rather serious looking Victorian (1890s) bride who is being dressed for her big day.


figjamlolita:

Victorian Goth Style Wedding Dress

figjamlolita:

Victorian Goth Style Wedding Dress


eponymousgodofmischief:

Victorian Steampunk Wedding

image

Why can’t I afford this?! =(


we-other-victorians:

John Everett Millais’ Ophelia (1851-2) is so ubiquitous that it’s one of those paintings, like the Mona Lisa, that has lost the magic of art with constant cultural bombardment. But few people know the story of the painting’s model, which is just as interesting, if not more, than the piece itself.
Elizabeth Siddal was the muse of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. A poet in her own right, she is now best known as the subject of numerous paintings by Millais, Deverell, Hunt, and more, and the crown of her reputation was her long, copper hair, just visible in this painting streaming out around her. Throughout her involvement in the PRB, she was engaged in a tumultuous affair with poet and painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The two met in 1849 and were engaged a year later. After a 10 year engagement, they married in 1860, but the relationship was never sunny by any measure.
Rossetti was known to have had affairs with other women and Siddal had long been addicted to laudanum (opium diluted with alcohol) which she used to treat her depression. After a stillbirth, Siddal’s depression deepened, and in 1862 she overdosed on laudanum. Her death was ruled accidental, but a number of apocryphal accounts claim that Rossetti found a suicide note, though he may have burned it as it would have caused a major scandal.
Just before the lid to her coffin was closed, Rossetti, in an act of desperate grief, placed his manuscripts in her coffin and they were buried with her. However, seven years later, his obsession with the lost poems drove him to exhume her coffin in order to retrieve them. The story goes that upon prying open the lid, he discovered that the copper hair which had made her famous in life had continued growing even after her death, filling the coffin and engulfing his manuscripts so that he was forced to dig through the flowing mass to find them. He was haunted by the exhumation for the rest of his life.

we-other-victorians:

John Everett Millais’ Ophelia (1851-2) is so ubiquitous that it’s one of those paintings, like the Mona Lisa, that has lost the magic of art with constant cultural bombardment. But few people know the story of the painting’s model, which is just as interesting, if not more, than the piece itself.

Elizabeth Siddal was the muse of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. A poet in her own right, she is now best known as the subject of numerous paintings by Millais, Deverell, Hunt, and more, and the crown of her reputation was her long, copper hair, just visible in this painting streaming out around her. Throughout her involvement in the PRB, she was engaged in a tumultuous affair with poet and painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The two met in 1849 and were engaged a year later. After a 10 year engagement, they married in 1860, but the relationship was never sunny by any measure.

Rossetti was known to have had affairs with other women and Siddal had long been addicted to laudanum (opium diluted with alcohol) which she used to treat her depression. After a stillbirth, Siddal’s depression deepened, and in 1862 she overdosed on laudanum. Her death was ruled accidental, but a number of apocryphal accounts claim that Rossetti found a suicide note, though he may have burned it as it would have caused a major scandal.

Just before the lid to her coffin was closed, Rossetti, in an act of desperate grief, placed his manuscripts in her coffin and they were buried with her. However, seven years later, his obsession with the lost poems drove him to exhume her coffin in order to retrieve them. The story goes that upon prying open the lid, he discovered that the copper hair which had made her famous in life had continued growing even after her death, filling the coffin and engulfing his manuscripts so that he was forced to dig through the flowing mass to find them. He was haunted by the exhumation for the rest of his life.



thehystericalsociety:

Pierrot the kitty - c. 1890s - (Via)

thehystericalsociety:

Pierrot the kitty - c. 1890s - (Via)


The Ruined Maid

The Ruined Maid
BY THOMAS HARDY
“O ‘Melia, my dear, this does everything crown!
Who could have supposed I should meet you in Town?
And whence such fair garments, such prosperi-ty?” —
“O didn’t you know I’d been ruined?” said she.

— “You left us in tatters, without shoes or socks,
Tired of digging potatoes, and spudding up docks;
And now you’ve gay bracelets and bright feathers three!” —
“Yes: that’s how we dress when we’re ruined,” said she.

— “At home in the barton you said thee’ and thou,’
And thik oon,’ and theäs oon,’ and t’other’; but now
Your talking quite fits ‘ee for high compa-ny!” —
“Some polish is gained with one’s ruin,” said she.

— “Your hands were like paws then, your face blue and bleak
But now I’m bewitched by your delicate cheek,
And your little gloves fit as on any la-dy!” —
“We never do work when we’re ruined,” said she.

— “You used to call home-life a hag-ridden dream,
And you’d sigh, and you’d sock; but at present you seem
To know not of megrims or melancho-ly!” —
“True. One’s pretty lively when ruined,” said she.

— “I wish I had feathers, a fine sweeping gown,
And a delicate face, and could strut about Town!” —
“My dear — a raw country girl, such as you be,
Cannot quite expect that. You ain’t ruined,” said she.


#ThankYou, whoever wrote this. Can we all stop shaming short hair now?  #Repunzel #ShortHair #LoveIt ✨💜✨

#ThankYou, whoever wrote this. Can we all stop shaming short hair now? #Repunzel #ShortHair #LoveIt ✨💜✨